Mon, Oct 23, 2017

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B7 Baltic Islands Network

  • Åland
    Åland
  • Gotland
    Gotland: Visby
  • Åland
    Åland
  • Saaremaa
    Saaremaa: Oti manor
  • Gotland
    Gotland
  • Gotland
    Gotland
  • Rügen
    Rügen
  • B7 family photo 2014
    Hiiumaa: B7 family photo
  • Rügen
    Rügen: Sand
  • Åland
    Åland
  • Åland
    Åland
  • Hiiumaa
    Hiiumaa
  • Saaremaa
    Saaremaa: Kuressaare maritime festival
  • Saaremaa
    Saaremaa: Causeway of Väike Väin Strait
  • Gotland
    Gotland: Visby
  • Hiiumaa
    Hiiumaa: Kõpu lighthouse
  • Gotland
    Gotland
  • Rügen
    Rügen
  • Rügen
    Rügen: Tourists in Binz
  • Åland
    Åland
  • Gotland
    Gotland
  • Åland
    Åland
  • Saaremaa
    Saaremaa: Angla windmills
  • Wave
    Wave
  • Rügen
    Rügen: Sassnitz cycle road
  • Åland
    Åland
  • Gotland
    Gotland
  • Rügen
    Rügen
  • Gotland
    Gotland

What is the B7?

world

What is the B7 Baltic Islands Network?

The B7 is a co-operation of islands in the Baltic Sea countries that began in 1989.

The Partners are:

Gotland (Sweden), Hiiumaa (Estonia), Rügen (Germany), Saaremaa (Estonia), Åland (autonomous region of Finland.

The Vision for the B7 islands:

The long-term vision for the islands can be explained quite simply as:

  • The islands find themselves with a richer, smarter and happier population.
  • The islands are also more in control of their own destiny than in 1990.

The Mission of the B7:

The B7 aims to use its strengths to promote the strategic goals of the islands.

The B7 islands believe that they can better serve the interests of the islanders and achieve more as a co-operation than alone.

Principles of membership:

  • Each member is a Baltic Sea region.
  • Each member contributes to the co-operation in an equal measure.
  • The B7 co-operation is a partnership of equals.

Organisation:

These two decision making bodies of the B7 are:

  • Steering Committee - the political body is made up of leading politicians from the islands.
  • Coordinators Group - the management body comprises senior executives from public administration.

Biannual Conference is the focal point of the B7 chairmanship period. The Biannual Conference is a forum with the purpose to convene all the members of the B7 to review the past two years and agree the plans for the coming years within the framework of the B7 Strategy. The Biannual Conference consists of, as a minimum, a Steering Committee meeting, Coordinators Group Meeting and open plenary sessions for debate and discussion.

B7 Steering Committee

The B7 STEERING COMMITTEE is the political body of the B7 and provides the framework and direction of the Baltic Islands Co-operation. The Steering Committee:

  • Consists of one politician from each of the member islands.
  • Develops and decides upon the orientation of the B7 activities.
  • Approves the biannual activity programme and budget of the B7 Baltic Islands Network.
  • Meets yearly and at the Biannual Conference at the chairing island.
  • Takes decisions with simple majority of the represented islands.

 


Gotland Meit Fohlin

Meit Fohlin
 
Region Gotland
Phone: +46 498 269 000
meit.fohlin[@]gotland.se

Hiiumaa Riho Rahuoja, Hiiu County Governor

Riho Rahuoja
Hiiu County Governor
Phone: +372 4636 040
Mobile: +372 5333 5116
riho.rahuoja[@]hiiu.maavalitsus.ee

Rügen uwe ahlers (medium)

Uwe Ahlers
Member Council Vorpommern-Rügen 
Phone: +49 3839 189 369  
Mobile: +49 1716 401 899
uwe.ahlers.consult[@]gmx.de

Saaremaa Jaan Leivategija

Jaan Leivategija
Temporary County Governor
Phone: +372 4520 505
jaan.leivategija[@]saare.maavalitsus.ee

Åland nina fellman aland.jpg

Nina Fellmann
Member of the Åland Government, Minister for Administrative Affairs
+358 1825 379
+358 4083 60220
nina.fellman[@]regeringen.ax

B7 Coordinators Group

The B7 COORDINATORS GROUP is the working body of the B7 that manages the work of the B7 Baltic Islands Network. The group:

  • Consists of representatives from each of the member islands.
  • Plans, leads, organises, monitors, controls, manages the budget and evaluates the work of the B7.
  • Ensures representatives from their islands implement projects and participate in the projects agreed in the activity programmes.
  • Meets as agreed in the biannual activity programme.
  • Takes decisions with simple majority of the represented islands.

 


 

 

Gotland
Maria Pettersson
Region Gotland
S-621 81 VISBY, SWEDEN
maria.petterrson03[@]gotland.se
Phone: +46 (0)498-20 41 54


 Ermo Mäeots, Hiiu County Government, Department of Education and Social Affairs

HIIUMAA
Ermo Mäeots
Hiiu County Government
Department of Education and Social Affairs
Head of department
Phone: +372 46 36063
ermo.maeots[@]hiiu.maavalitsus.ee


Martina Schwinkendorf, Landkreis Vorpommern-Rügen, Regional Development Office

RÜGEN
Martina Schwinkendorf
Landkreis Vorpommern-Rügen (County district Vorpommern-Rügen)
Regional Development Office
Phone: +49 3831 3571261
martina.schwinkendorf[@]lk-vr.de


Anneli Meisterson, Saare County Government, Youth Work Adviser

SAAREMAA
Anneli Meisterson
Saare County Government
Youth Work Adviser
Phone: +372 452 0528
Mobile: +372 5347 0011
anneli.meisterson[@]saare.maavalitsus.ee

 

ÅLAND
Niclas Karlsson
Adviser European and External Affairs
The Government of Åland
Phone: +358 18 25 104
niclas.karlsson[@]regeringen.ax

Åland

Åland is a group of islands with an extensive archipelago situated between Finland and Sweden. Åland is an autonomous, demilitarized region within the republic of Finland. Åland became autonomous in 1921, when the Ålanders first tried to reunify with their old mother country Sweden, but Finland was unwilling to accept this. The dispute was referred to the League of Nations in Geneva, which decided that Åland should remain a part of Finland but receive a wide autonomy. As a result, Finland has to protect the Swedish language, culture and local customs of the Ålanders. The Ålanders also have their own government and parliament, their own budget and the right to legislate in areas such as education and training, healthcare, trade and industry, municipal administration and traffic and transport. Åland also has one seat in the Finnish Parliament.

 

Åland has been a member of the EU since 1995 but remains outside the fiscal union, which means it has customs frontier with other countries, including Finland. Another specialty is that indirect taxation will not apply in Åland. These exemptions were essential to safeguard the future of Åland’s ferry industry, and with that, the communications to and from the islands. The currency is euro.

 

Nature

The region consists of thousands of islands and rocky islets of which more than 6 500 are named and 60 inhabited. The population totalled 28 900 persons at the end of 2014. Åland covers a land area of 1 553 km², but including water area the territory amounts to 13 325 km². The nature on the Åland Islands is unique and relatively unspoiled. The landscape, as well as the extensive archipelago, is open and varied.

 

The geographic situation places special demands on both internal and external communications. The nearest markets are the Finnish and Swedish mainland which constitutes an actual transportation distance approx. 500 km in both directions. These geographic conditions also contribute to accentuating the large regional differences within Åland, with the main economic activities being heavily concentrated to Mariehamn, the only city on the islands. Åland is a small region with an open economy and thus highly dependent on trade in goods and services with surrounding areas.

 

Economy

Shipping, agriculture and fishing have long been Åland's basic industries although tourism is ever expanding. The tourist branch is, however, very seasonal. Shipping is the hub of the Åland economy and it is easy to see its connections with the land-related industries. The variety of educational courses offered at secondary level is relatively comprehensive and flexible. There are few opportunities, however, to pursue further studies at university level, which is why students, who aim at taking a university degree, leave the islands for a period of time.

 
   

aland

 

Links

Åland in Brief

 

Åland Government

 

b7plakat_aaland_res_1

       

Gotland

The first Stone Age settlers came to Gotland about 7 000 years ago, and many traces of their dwelling-places can still be seen. From the Bronze Age there are an abundance of large stone cairns and stone ship graves. During the Viking era the merchants and wealthy farmers of Gotland were active participants in the midst of world trade for 500 years. Vast treasures were accumulated on the island. Well-preserved stone churches (over ninety in number), were constructed during the Middle Ages. Gradually the burghers of Visby overtook the farmers' trade. Visby became a town with strong German interests and a member of the Hanseatic League. During the late Middle Ages, trade declined, diminishing Gotland's position. The Danish king, Valdemar Atterdag's conquest of Gotland in 1361 marked the final turning point. Gotland became thereafter, after different periods of Danish, Swedish and German rule, finally Swedish in 1679.

 

Population

At present there are 58 000 inhabitants on Gotland, representing 0,7% of the population of Sweden. The approximate 1500 refugees now staying on Gotland not included. The population of Gotland declined dramatically through migration from the island during the 1940's and 50's.

However since 1965 Gotland has had a population increase almost every year due in large to more people moving in than out. The expansion of the public sector has been one contributory factor as well as the large number of companies, about 7500, on the island. This is mostly small enterprises.

Gotland's insular position promotes strong local ties and loyalty to Gotlandish traditions, history and culture among its inhabitants, natives as well as newcomers, giving rise to a very strong regional identity and a firm resolve to remain on the island. There is, therefore, a long tradition of local commitment on Gotland. Different kinds of organisations such as folklore and parish societies, rural development groups, sports clubs and popular movements, etc. remain vigorous on the island.

 

Economy

The structure of the economy differs markedly from that of the rest of the country. The most pronounced difference is seen in the high proportion of people employed in the agriculture and forestry sector and in the public sector. Tourism is also a growing sector. And with the new cruise quay completed in spring 2018 bigger cruise vessels will be able to come into the port of Visby.

Agriculture is dominated by family farms and focuses mainly on animal husbandry and vegetable cultivation. Traditional Gotlandish industrial production is based on local products such as agricultural products, limestone and lumber. High tech enterprises can also benefit from the fiber optics network that is built out over the entire island and gives excellent possibilities for work over the net form every corner of the island.

 

The Future

There must be an increase in population in order to retain and develop the level of service on Gotland, both in terms of quantity and quality. To be able to increase the population Gotland needs more employment opportunities, to replace lost jobs, to reduce unemployment, and for new residents.

Gotland's plan for the future, Vision Gotland 2025 focus therefore on strengthening business and creating more employment opportunities. Some of the suggested measures are developing small entrepre-neurship, creating preconditions for increased tourism, strengthening Gotland's position as a meeting place and intensifying efforts towards the creation of a society geared to ecological cycles.

   

gotland

 

Links

Gotland County

 

Information:


www.alltomgotland.se

 

www.selectgotland.com

 

b7plakat_gotland_res_1

B7 Info

WHAT is the B7?

The B7 is a co-operation of the 7 largest islands in the Baltic Sea from 5 different countries. The B7 believes that as a co-operation they can influence developments for their common good. At the time of starting, PARTNERS of the B7 co-operation were Bornholm (Denmark), Gotland (Sweden), Hiiumaa (Estonia), Rügen (Germany), Saaremaa (Estonia), Åland (autonomous region of Finland), and Öland (Sweden). Since 2014 co-operations will continues with 5 islands (without Bornholm and Öland).

BENEFITS and OPPORTUNITIES of the B7 CO-OPERATION:

  • An organization that can lobby to promote island issues at the national and international level
  • A network to exchange experiences and ideas
  • An union that works at the political, public official and grass roots levels
  • A co-operation to develop interregional programmes and projects
  • The framework for an extensive network of contacts

The PRINCIPLES of MEMBERSHIP are:

  • The B7 co-operation is a partnership of equals
  • Each member is a Baltic Sea island
  • Each island contributes to the co-operation based on population size

FACTS ABOUT B7

  • Co-operation started in 1989
  • Focuses on the development of islands
  • Develops and implements large and small projects, events, conferences, exchanges
  • Operations managed by an Annual Conference, rotating Chairmanship and Secretariat
  • Works through ad hoc and permanent workgroups such as People to People, Environment and Sustainability, Tourism co-operation etc.
  • Participates in developing strategies and solutions for tackling key island issues such as transport, communication, marine environment, energy
  • Started with one island being a member of the EU. Now all islands are EU members
  • The population of B7 islands is about 250 thousand inhabitants

VISION 2020

The B7 islands offer an attractive living environment with a sustainable development. Connecting their people, professionals and businesses across borders, the B7 cooperation has contributed to put the islands more in control of their own destiny. Through exchange of experience, lobby and projects B7 cooperation has helped make the islands’ more resilient and their population richer, smarter and happier.

Members of the B7 Coordinators Group

The COORDINATORS GROUP manages the work of the B7.

The Coordinating Group:

  • Consists of representatives from each of the member islands.
  • Meets as agreed in the biannual activity programme.
  • The representative of the island holding the biannual rotating chairmanship chairs meetings.
  • The Coordinators Group plans, leads, organises, monitors, controls, manages the budget and evaluates the work of the B7.
  • Reports on the B7 activities at the General Meeting, including an executive summary and statement of accounts, and at the B7 website.
  • Ensures representatives from their islands are appointed to implement the annual programmes within the agreed budget.
  • Decisions will be taken with simple majority by the represented islands.

 

 

Gotland
Maria Pettersson
Region Gotland
S-621 81 VISBY, SWEDEN
maria.petterrson03[@]gotland.se
Phone: +46 (0)498-20 41 54


 Ermo Mäeots, Hiiu County Government, Department of Education and Social Affairs

HIIUMAA
Ermo Mäeots
Hiiu County Government
Department of Education and Social Affairs
Head of department
Phone: +372 46 36063
ermo.maeots[@]hiiu.maavalitsus.ee


Martina Schwinkendorf, Landkreis Vorpommern-Rügen, Regional Development Office

RÜGEN
Martina Schwinkendorf
Landkreis Vorpommern-Rügen (County district Vorpommern-Rügen)
Regional Development Office
Phone: +49 3831 3571261
martina.schwinkendorf[@]lk-vr.de


Anneli Meisterson, Saare County Government, Youth Work Adviser

SAAREMAA
Anneli Meisterson
Saare County Government
Youth Work Adviser
Phone: +372 452 0528
Mobile: +372 5347 0011
anneli.meisterson[@]saare.maavalitsus.ee

 

ÅLAND
Niclas Karlsson
Adviser European and External Affairs
The Government of Åland
Phone: +358 18 25 104
niclas.karlsson[@]regeringen.ax

MA/JS launches support to project development

Are you ready for Interreg Baltic Sea Region? This week, the Managing Authority/ Joint Secretariat (MA/JS) launches support activities to project development for the first call of the new Programme. You can now find the key information on the Programme website. The JS is ready to give feedback on specific project ideas. Face-to-face support will be started soon as well. Note that the Programme is not finally approved. Thus the date of the first call cannot be specified yet. Please find detailed information below: http://eu.baltic.net/Project-support-launched.30215.html

Öland

olandÖland is the second largest Swedish island and the smallest of the traditional provinces of Sweden. Öland has an area of 1,342 km² and is located in the Baltic Sea just off the coast of Småland. The island has 25,000 inhabitants, but during Swedish Midsummer it is visited by up to 500,000 people. It is separated from the mainland by the Kalmar Strait and connected to it by the 6 km Öland Bridge, which opened in 1972.

Administration

The traditional provinces of Sweden serve no administrative or political purposes, but are historical and cultural entities. Öland is part of the administrative county Kalmar County (Kalmar län) and is divided in two municipalities, Borgholm Municipality and Mörbylånga Municipality. There was an Öland County in the short period between 1819 and 1826; otherwise, the island has been part of Kalmar County since 1634.

www.olandsturist.se

World heritage profile

 

Good luck, Arne!

PtP WG mit Rad 2012For eight years we have worked together with Arne Grau-Amnér in the PtP workgroup of B7.

During this time we organised youth projects, culture events, cooking classes or B7 Days that their participants will surely remember with great pleasure. Due to your engagement lots of youngsters and adults did experience interesting meetings with people from the other Baltic Sea islands. No matter whether they understand sooner or later, a good and very important job for all those people has been done.

Good luck for you, Arne, with your new job. We have loved to work together with you - even if we had to cycle - and, maybe, we can cooperate in future projects.

 

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